Custom-made Ultrasound Transducers Lead to Rapid 3D Imaging of Mouse Embryos

By utilizing our custom-made ultrasound transducers, a set of image slices that form a 3D image of an embryo can be acquired in less than one minute.

Riverside Research biomedical engineering expert Dr. Jeffrey Ketterling has developed special ultrasound transducers, known as annular arrays, to image mouse embryos. The mouse is the most common mammal used to understand human development and disease, and ultrasound is the only non-invasive, real-time imaging modality capable of rapidly generating 3D image data of the in utero embryo. By utilizing our custom-made ultrasound transducers, a set of image slices that form a 3D image of an embryo can be acquired in less than one minute. The images reveal details such as the developing spine, brain, and heart.

In collaboration with researchers at the Skirball Institute of Biomolecular Medicine at the New York University Langone Medical Center, Riverside Research is conducting studies to develop automatic image-processing tools to track the growth and shape of embryonic organ systems and to detect differences between normal and abnormal (mutant) embryos. The project uses our annular-array as the gold standard for image quality before transitioning to the more widely-available linear-array systems to ensure that the latter system is not missing any fine-resolution detail. This project is funded by an NIH grant awarded to Dr. Ketterling (Riverside Research) and Dr. Daniel H. Turnbull (Skirball).